A.M. O’Malley

A.M. O’Malley (CNF, Hybrid, Poetry) | Portland, OR

Booking Fee:

$500

Will Travel:

Anywhere

Contact:

annmarieomalley_at_gmail.com

Website:

http://amomalley.com

A.M. O’Malley has recently been published in The Newer York, Unshod Quills, Nailed Magazine, The Nervous Breakdown, Jerkpoet, Poor Claudia, The Burnside Review and The Portland Review. Ms. O’Malley’s first full length book of hybrid poem-memoir Expecting Something Else was published on University of Hell Press in 2016. She is a Literary Arts Writers in the Schools teaching artist, a Young Audiences Teaching Artist Studio graduate, a Regional Arts and Culture Council grant recipient and winner of the 2014 Skidmore Prize. In 2012, Ms. O’Malley started a writing and publishing program at the Columbia River Correctional Institution and goes there every Tuesday night to teach writing to incarcerated men. She also teaches writing, collage art and self-publishing at Portland Community College. She lives and works in Portland, Oregon where she is the Executive Director at the Independent Publishing Resource Center.

Books

Expecting Something Else (University of Hell, 2016). Poetry. CNF. Memoir. Hybrid.


Press & Reviews

FINALLY a book that recognizes the fundamental fact of form reflected in Willem de Kooning’s statement: “Content is a glimpse of something.” A.M. O’Malley’s Expect Something Else made me giddy again inside the pleasure of her text. By carefully destorying and restorying prior texts, she brilliantly opens up possibilities of meaning-making that made me swoon. I live for books like this but they rarely come. A triumph.
—Lidia Yuknavitch, Author of The Small Backs of Children

I eloped with this book, in the sense that it moved me quickly and in secret from one terrifyingly real place to another. It was like riding in the back seat of a car made of welded together nightgowns. These poems are in my blood like deer.
—James Gendron, Author of Sexual Boats (Sex Boats)

Expecting Something Else is a tornadic memoir of uncommon experiences and serves as a reminder nothing is normal—that normal isn’t a measurement. A.M. O’Malley breaks all the dishes, busts all the furniture of identity, and leaves us readers in the quiet wake of inheritance—that is to say in a reflective state wondering about our behavior.
—Carl Adamshick, Author of Saint Friend