Marci Calabretta Cancio-Bello

Marci Calabretta Cancio-Bello (Poetry) | Miami, FL

Booking Fee:

Negotiable

Will Travel:

Anywhere

Contact:

http://www.marcicalabretta.com/contact.html

Website:

http://www.marcicalabretta.com

Marci Calabretta Cancio-Bello is the author of Hour of the Ox, which won the 2015 AWP Donald Hall Prize for Poetry, and Last Train to the Midnight Market (2013). A Kundiman and Knight Foundation poetry fellow, her work has appeared in Best New Poets 2015, Columbia: A Journal of Literature & Art, Los Angeles Review of Books Quarterly, Narrative Magazine, and more. She serves as co-founding editor for Print-Oriented Bastards, assistant editor for Jai-Alai Magazine, and producer for The Working Poet Radio Show. www.marcicalabretta.com

Books

Hour of the Ox (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2016). AWP Donald Hall Prize for Poetry. Poetry.


Chapbooks

Cancio-Calabretta_Last_Train_to_the_Midnight_Market_sm
Last Train to the Midnight Market (Finishing Line Press, 2013). Poetry.

Press & Reviews

Hour of the Ox is a timeless collection written by a poet of exceptional talent and grace, a voice as tough as it is tender. Poignant and beautifully composed, these elegies hum with emotional potency and moved me beyond measure. This immigrant story emerges through the hands, mouths, hearts, mournings, and voices of a family an ocean away and is exquisite, lyrical, and an incredible and rare gift.”
—Crystal Ann Williams

“A striking and rare combination of spare precision and rich details, Hour of the Ox tells a quiet, yet grand and universal tale of place and displacement, loss and renewal, illusion and disillusion. This is one of the most compelling books of poetry I’ve read in years, not simply because of its seamless craft, but more so because of its pure and urgent voice possessed by that ineffable quality that makes poetry, poetry.”
—Richard Blanco, Presidential Inaugural Poet, author of Looking for The Gulf Motel

“Marci Calabretta Cancio-Bello’s powerful debut introduces us to a world where the modern elegy sings across ocean and bone, and where it’s possible ‘storms fanned from the ears of elephants.’ This magnificent book is ‘not a love song, nor a glossary of despair,’ but rather wholly enchanting and original, bearing the beauties and failures of the body and all of ‘what the sea asks us to return.’”
—Aimee Nezhukumatathil