Stephen Lackaye

Stephen Lackaye (Poetry) | Portland, OR

Booking Fee:

Negotiable

Will Travel:

Anywhere

Contact:

https://stephenlackaye.com/contact/

Website:

https://stephenlackaye.com

Stephen Lackaye is the author of Self-Portrait in Dystopian Landscape, winner of the 2015 Unicorn Press First Book Award. He is the recipient of a New Writer’s Award from the Scottish Arts Council, and holds degrees from the University of Southern California, University of Edinburgh, and the Johns Hopkins University. Originally from Poughkeepsie, NY, he lives with his family in Oregon.

Books

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Self-Portrait in Dystopian Landscape (Unicorn Press, 2016). Poetry.

Blurbs, Press & Reviews

“In his masterful and powerful debut collection of poems, Self-Portrait in Dystopian Landscape, Stephen Lackaye’s sweeping and muscular meditations enfold the piercing reflections of their speaker with luminous broad-stroked sketches of his passage through the urban (and a few natural) landscapes of this precarious time. This is an incisive, deeply wise, and illuminating collection of poems—a superb new voice has joined the ever-shifting landscape of contemporary American poetry.”
—David St. John, author of The Auroras

“Bereft and lost as Odysseus going home, the singer of these poems wanders a place where a butterfly is a knife, a brother a ghost, and ‘all that’s possible betrays us.’ The hero of Stephen Lackaye’s Self-Portrait in Dystopian Landscape is a cunning warrior left to his wits, and poem after poem deepens the story of his survival. What rings out in the end astounds me—something tender and lovely and new. What an amazing poet, what a gorgeous book.”
—Steve Scafidi, author of The Cabinetmaker’s Window

“Very few young poets are brave enough to embrace silence in order to listen intently to the murmurings of the mind. Stephen Lackaye is one of them, and his extraordinary debut, Self-Portrait in a Dystopian Landscape, embodies that bravery and wisdom. This book is a life-affirming instrument of truth. By means of sly wit, arresting imagery, and a mature lyric craft, it persuades us to transcend the intimate and public wreckages of our present moment.”
—David Roderick, author of The Americans