Yu-Han Chao

Yu-Han Chao (Fiction, Poetry) | Merced, CA

Booking Fee:

Negotiable

Will Travel:

Anywhere

Contact:

chaoeugenia_at_gmail.com

Website:

http://www.yuhanchao.com/

Yu-Han (Eugenia) Chao was born and grew up in Taipei, Taiwan. Educated at National Taiwan University, Trinity College, and Penn State University, she received the Katey Lehman fellowship at Penn State and Henry Luce Foundation Chinese Poetry and Translation Fellowship at Vermont Studio Center. Her poetry and fiction have been nominated for the Pushcart Prize. She recently transitioned from academia to become a registered nurse.

Books

Sex and Taipei City (Red Hen Press, 2019). Short Stories. Fiction.
We Grow Old: Fifty-Three Chinese Love Poems (The Backwaters Press, 2008). Poetry.


Chapbooks

  • Stray Cats (Dancing Girl Press, 2015). Poetry.
  • The Alphabet Between Legs (Boaat Press, 2014). Poetry.
  • One Woman Fruit Stand (Imaginary Friend Press, 2014). Poetry.
  • House Cats (Dancing Girl Press, 2014). Poetry.
  • My Body Is Not a Textbook But You Are My Mango (Dancing Girl Press, 2013). Poetry.

Blurbs, Press & Reviews

Sex and Taipei City (Forthcoming 2019)

“Contemporary Taiwan’s contradictions come to life in Yu-Han Chao’s wonderful and gossipy collection, Sex and Taipei City. The urban denizens that populate Chao’s words are modern only in appearance and they helplessly careen toward their strange destinies, conveyed by age-old superstition and the failures of intimacy. These are the stories shared between rounds of karaoke that are so juicy and awful, you don’t realize it when your song comes on.”
—Ed Lin, author of Ghost Month.

We Grow Old  (2008)

“These fine poems theorize love and they bathe in it, too. In this book skin itself casts some long shadows and the shadows fall across and gather a wide and surprising range of lovers’ concerns–cat toys, e.g., or the footless nature of ghosts, and that ‘teeth come and go.’ And the poem (for this is really one poem in fifty-three parts, one long song) rises from its pages, from its particulars, and dazzlingly circles the globe.”
—C.S. Giscombe