Lauren Camp

Lauren Camp (Poetry) | Santa Fe, NM

Booking Fee:

Negotiable

Will Travel:

Anywhere

Contact:

laurenat_sign_13x20laurencamp.com

Website:

http://www.laurencamp.com

Lauren Camp is the author of three books of poems, most recently One Hundred Hungers, which won the Dorset Prize. She is a Black Earth Institute Fellow and the recipient of a National Federation of Press Women Poetry Book Prize, a Margaret Randall Poetry Prize and an Anna Davidson Rosenberg Award. Her poems appear in New England Review, Poetry International, Academy of American Poets Poem-a-Day, Slice, The Seattle Review, Beloit Poetry Journal and elsewhere, and she has twice guest-edited special sections for World Literature Today. 
Lauren is a veteran public radio producer and host of “Audio Saucepan”—a global music program interwoven with contemporary poetry—on Santa Fe Public Radio.

Books

One Hundred Hungers (Tupelo, 2016).
One Hundred Hungers (Tupelo, 2016).
The Dailiness (Edwin E. Smith Publishing, 2013)
The Dailiness (Edwin E. Smith Publishing, 2013)
This Business of Wisdom (West End Press, 2011)
This Business of Wisdom (West End Press, 2010)

Press & Reviews

“[One Hundred Hungers] is inventively structured, mixing personal lyrics with a series of short, gnomic and haunting vignettes that seem to reside almost outside of time. And the particular diaspora which the book derives from—capturing the experience of an Iraqi-Jewish immigrant family—makes for a still more complicated stance, one of exile within exile, as it were. . . . . It’s a haunting and powerful book.”
— David Wojahn, judge for the Dorset Prize

“I tuned in today to the Live Stream from DIWAN, and watched you read your remarkable poems. I just wanted to tell you how moved and touched I was by your incredible, compelling precision in mapping out, so beautifully, your personal and familial memories. The reading itself was a captivating work of art. In respect and admiration”
—Anton Shammas, writer, poet and translator

“Her words speak of the essential mystery of human experience, but also reconciliation of seeming opposites. The poet tells us ‘listen. Yes, listen.’ Strong advice in today’s world, torn as it is by dissension.”
—Miriam Sagan, writer