Lindsay Tigue

Lindsay Tigue (Poetry) | Athens, GA

Booking Fee:

Negotiable

Will Travel:

Anywhere

Contact:

lindsaytigue_at_gmail.com

Website:

http://lindsaytigue.wordpress.com

Lindsay Tigue is the author of System of Ghosts, winner of the 2015 Iowa Poetry Prize and published by the University of Iowa Press in 2016. She writes poetry and fiction and her work appears in Prairie Schooner, Blackbird, Rattle, diode, and Hayden’s Ferry Review, among other journals. She was a Tennessee Williams Scholar at the Sewanee Writers’ Conference and has received a James Merrill fellowship from the Vermont Studio Center. She is a graduate of the MFA program in Creative Writing and Environment at Iowa State University and is a current PhD student in Creative Writing at the University of Georgia.

Books

System of Ghosts (University of Iowa Press, 2016). Poetry.


Press & Reviews

“Lindsay Tigue has, first and foremost, a curious mind: her poems are motored by information. Bits of knowledge, gathered magpie-like, which others might consider trivia–the origins of the red and green on traffic lights, the different ways distant towns told time before railroads connected them, the composition of the asteroid Ceres–spur these poems toward startling personal and public insights. As in the poetry of Robyn Schiff and the prose of Eula Biss, these esoteric facts, knit together carefully and with a gentle sense of mischievous humor, come to generalize about human suffering and hope.”
—Craig Morgan Teicher, To Keep Love Blurry

System of Ghosts explores frontiers vanishing and gone. With a restless intelligence, Lindsay Tigue’s poems seek to know, to measure, to recover histories nearly lost. In these pages the world and the self are fantasized, destroyed, shared like an orange, abandoned like a rough draft, as unforgettable as the dead.”
—Traci Brimhall, Our Lady of the Ruins

“Lindsay Tigue’s work presents a vision, dominated by geography and natural history, uniquely paired with emotional imagination—the not-there-ness that coexists with its there-ness. This crush together, her feelings always a bit estranged from her, replaced by her gravitation to facts that she has remembered.”
—Diane Wakoski, Bay of Angels

“In her first book, Tigue has mastered a technique of taking facts and using them as a springboard to wherever her imagination leads her. ”
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