Chris Tusa

Chris Tusa (Fiction) | Baton Rouge, LA

Booking Fee:

Negotiable

Will Travel:

Anywhere

Contact:

https://www.christophertusa.com/contact

Website:

https://www.christophertusa.com

Chris Tusa has an M.F.A. in Creative Writing from the University of Florida. His debut novel, Dirty Little Angels, was published by the University of West Alabama in 2009. His second novel, In the City of Falling Stars, was published in 2016 by the University of West Alabama. His work has appeared in Prairie Schooner, New South, Connecticut Review, Five Points, Texas Review, The Southeast Review, storySouth, New Delta Review, South Dakota Review, and many others. Aside from acting as Managing Editor of Fiction Southeast, Tusa divides his time between teaching full-time in the English Department at LSU and acting as Writer-in-Residence at Southeastern Louisiana University.

Books

In the City of Falling Stars (University of West Alabama Press, 2016). Novel. Fiction.
Dirty Little Angels (University of West Alabama Press, 2009). Novel. Fiction.
Haunted Bones (Louisiana Literature Press, 2006). Poetry.

 

 


Blurbs, Press & Reviews

“Tusa has cultivated a dark, intensely lyrical novel about the horrors, fears, and the persistent anxieties that plagued New Orleans in the years after Katrina decimated their normal ways of life.”
—Steven Petite, Huffington Post

“If I had a dollar for every sentence in Dirty Little Angels that blew my mind, I’d be able to buy a decent Chevy Nova outright.”
—Donald Ray Pollock, author of Knockemstiff

“In his engrossing novel In the City of Falling Stars, Chris Tusa captures the paranoia and violence and shattered relationships of a city betrayed by its government and left in ruins.”
—John Biguenet, author of The Torturer’s Apprentice and Oyster

In the City of Falling Stars marries the ancient high gothic fever-dreamed catastrophes of the Old South to the new New South’s noirish pre-post-apocalyptic fandangos below the bug line. Chris Tusa’s new New Orleans novel creates its own humid and humorous microclimate where despair fights it out with delight and each and every super-saturated detail is delivered in showers of messed-up meteoritic prose.”
—Michael Martone, author of Michael Martone and Four for a Quarter